Free Immunization Schedule (Record) Templates for Kids – PDF

Immunization Schedule

Immunization or vaccinations form an essential part of a person’s health records. Parents have the burden of ensuring that their child receives recommended vaccines at the right time. The standards by the Centre for Disease Control, CDC, also require that a person’s immunization schedules are documented in a manner that is accurate, complete and accessible.

An immunization record is a comprehensive breakdown of all vaccinations that a person has received in their lifetime.

On the other hand,

An immunization schedule is a layout plan of all the vaccinations a person should receive. The latter is mandatory for babies and most teens.

What is Vaccination?

Vaccination is the introduction of an antigenic substance (inoculation) or a vaccine into the body to improve its immunity to protect an individual from a particular disease or strain of the disease.

Kids are vaccinated for different diseases depending on where they live, their health, prevalent disease, and the vaccines available. The list of all the vaccinations a child should receive is documented in an immunization schedule. An immunization schedule contains the time of the vaccination, the vaccine, explanation, and special vaccinations.  All the vaccinations a kid has had should be recorded in an immunization record. An immunization record contains the date of vaccination, the dosages, age of the child, the medical facility where the child was vaccinated, and the name of the medical physician who administered the vaccine.

Birth to 15 Months

Vaccination of children begins at birth. Doctors and parents likewise ought to be aware of the vaccines the children should receive at different stages, for the efficacy of most vaccines will depend on the time/age of inoculation. The table below illustrates the different vaccines administered to children after birth and up to 15 months of age.

VaccineAbbreviation and purposeDosage and time
Hepatitis BHepB – Mostly given to newborns before being discharged from hospital in case the mothers know or do not know they are Hepatitis B positive.1st dose at birth 2nd dose between 1-2 months 3rd dose between 6-15 months
RotavirusRV  RV1- a 2-dose series and RV5- a 3-dose series – used to protect children from rotavirus disease1st dose at 2 months 2nd dose at 4 months 3rd dose at 6 months
Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis DTaP <7 years – given to protect against Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis1st dose at 2 months 2nd dose at 4 months 3rd dose at 6 months 4th dose at 15 months
Haemophilus influenzae type b  Hib – used to protect children from Haemophilus influenza type b disease1st dose at 2 months 2nd dose at 4 months Depending on the doctor’s notes, a dose can be administered at 6 months. 3rd or 4th dose between 12-15 months
Pneumococcal conjugatePCV13 – prevents pneumococcal disease1st dose at 2 months 2nd dose at 4 months 3rd dose at 6 months 4th dose between 12-15 months
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV: < 18 Yrs.)IPV <18 years – prevent children from polio1st dose at 2 months 2nd dose at 4 months 3rd dose between 6-15 months  
Influenza (IIV)IIV – used to protect persons against 3 different seasonal influenza viruses (influenza A and 1B and 2B)Administered annually 1-2 doses to children between 6-15 months.  
Influenza (LAIV4)LAIV4 – protects against 4 different influenza virusesNo action recommended
Measles, mumps, rubellaMMR – used to prevent measles, mumps, and rubellaAt 6-9 months, intervention should be made for children at a high-risk 1st dose between 12- 15 months  for all children
VaricellaVAR – used to protect persons from chickenpox1st dose between 12-15 months
Hepatitis AHepA – used to prevent Hepatitis AAction to be taken between 6-9 months for children at a high risk Between 12-15 months, a 2-dose series is to be administered to all children
Tetanus, Diphtheria, and acellular pertussis TdAp > 7 years – used to prevent tetanus, Diphtheria, and acellular pertussis Not applicable
Human papillomavirus HPV – used to prevent HPV types 16 and HPV type 18 that causes most HPV cancersNot applicable
MeningococcalMenACWY-D  > 9 months MenACWY-CRM  > 2 months MenACWY-TT > 2 years (MenACWY vaccine is used to protect against 4 strains of Meningococcal bacteria – A, C, W, and Y, known to cause meningitis and (septicemia) blood poisoningChildren at high risk should be vaccinated between 2-15 months
Meningococcal BMenB – protects persons from infection by Meningococcal group B bacteriaNo recommended action
Pneumococcal polysaccharide   PPSV23 – used to prevent severe Pneumococcal diseaseNo recommended action

18 Months to 18 Years

Vaccination in minors progresses even after 15 months of age.  Some of the vaccinations given are continuations of vaccinations given between birth and 15 months of age, while others are dependent on the urgency or health condition of the child. The table illustrates vaccination schedules for kids between the age of 18 months and 18 years.

VaccineAbbreviation and purposeDosage and time period
Hepatitis BHepB – Mostly given to newborns before being discharged from hospital in case the mothers know or do not know they are Hepatitis B positive.3rd dose at 18 months Catch up immunization is recommended between 19 months-18 years
RotavirusRV  RV1- a 2-dose series and RV5- a 3-dose series – used to protect children from rotavirus diseaseNot applicable
Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis DTaP <7 years – given to protect against Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis4th dose at 18 months Catch-up immunization between 19 months to 3 years. 5th dose at 4-6 years
Haemophilus influenzae type b  Hib – used to protect children from Haemophilus influenza type b diseaseCatch-up immunization is recommended between 18 months and 6 years. High-risk groups can be vaccinated between 7-18 years
Pneumococcal conjugatePCV13 – prevents pneumococcal diseaseCatch up immunization is recommended between 18 months and 6 years High-risk groups can be vaccinated between 7-18 years
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV: < 18 Yrs.)IPV <18 years – prevent children from polio3rd dose at 18 months Catch up immunization is recommended between 19 months and 6 years 4th dose at 4-6 years Catch up immunization is recommended between 7-17 years No action is recommended at 18 years  
Influenza (IIV)IIV – used to protect persons against 3 different seasonal influenza viruses (influenza A and 1B and 2B)1 or 2 of annual vaccination doses for kids between 18 months to 8 years 1 annual vaccination dose for children above 8 years
Influenza (LAIV4)LAIV4 – protects against 4 different influenza virusesNo action is recommended between 18-23 months 1 or 2 annual vaccination doses between 2-8 years 1 annual vaccination dose for kids over 8 years but younger the 18 years
Measles, mumps, rubellaMMR – used to prevent measles, mumps, and rubellaCatch immunization between 18 months to 3 years 2nd dose at 4-6 years Catch up immunization at 7-18 years
VaricellaVAR – used to protect persons from chickenpoxCatch immunization between 18 months to 3 years 2nd dose at 4-6 years Catch up immunization at 7-18 years
Hepatitis AHepA – used to prevent Hepatitis AA 2-dose series between 18-23 months Catch up immunization for kids over 2 up to 18 years
Tetanus, Diphtheria, and acellular pertussis TdAp > 7 years – used to prevent tetanus, Diphtheria, and acellular pertussis Not applicable up to 6 years Catch up immunization at 7-10 years Vaccination at 11-12 years High-risk groups can be vaccinated at 13-18 years Catch up immunization can be administered at 13-18 years
Human papillomavirus HPV – used to prevent HPV types 16 and HPV type 18 that causes most HPV cancersNo action is recommended between 18 months- 6 years High-risk groups can be vaccinated at 8-10 years Vaccination can be administered depending on shared clinical-decision making between ages 8-10 years Vaccination at 11-12 years Catch up immunization can be administered at 13-18 years
MeningococcalMenACWY-D  > 9 months MenACWY-CRM  > 2 months MenACWY-TT > 2 years (MenACWY vaccine is used to protect against 4 strains of Meningococcal bacteria – A, C, W, and Y, known to cause meningitis and (septicemia) blood poisoningCertain high-risk groups can be vaccinated between 18 months to 10 years 1st dose at 11-12 years Catch up immunization is recommended at 13-15 years 2nd dose at 16 years Catch up immunization is recommended at 17-18 years
Meningococcal BMenB – protects persons from infection by Meningococcal group B bacteriaNo action is recommended between 18 months and 8 years, but high risks groups can be vaccinated between 8-18 years Vaccination can be administered depending on shared clinical-decision making between ages 16-18 years
Pneumococcal polysaccharide   PPSV23 – used to prevent severe Pneumococcal diseaseNo action is recommended between 18-23 months Certain high-risk groups can be vaccinated between 2-18 years

Note: Vaccination recommendations for individuals aged 19 years or older are documented in the Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule, 2021.

Special Note: Covid Vaccination

With COVID-19 being an issue at hand, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (AICP) has recommended the use of COVID-19 vaccines for individuals aged 12 years and above. The use of the vaccines has to, however, be within the scope of the Emergency Use Authorization provided for the specific vaccine. COVID-19 vaccines can be administered the same day as other vaccines.

Importance of Immunization Record and Schedule

A vaccination schedule is essential as it provides details on the specific vaccinations your child or teenager should have and when. It can be used to prepare reminders and plan your monthly visits to the health unit or family doctor.

 Immunization records become helpful as a child grows. It may be required in the following scenarios:

  • When the child is starting a nursery school
  • When a child is transferring from one school to another
  • When going camping
  • When traveling to another country
  • When joining college, university or the army
  • During emergency healthcare

It is vital that parents take proper care of their child’s immunization records as most governments do not have a central database for such documentation. One will have to undergo an immunization test if he or she cannot provide proof of immunization.

Contents of Immunization Record and Schedule

Following are the major contents mentioned in the immunization record and schedule:

Immunization schedule

The plan contains the following information:

Time of vaccine:  The schedule is ordered in terms of the times when a vaccine is to be administered. It begins with the vaccines that a baby is given at birth and goes on as the child becomes of age. Some schedules go up to five years, others for up to 18 years.

Vaccine:  It provides the name of the vaccine. Most of the names are abbreviated, such as DTaP (Diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis vaccine).

Explanations:  The schedule provides additional comments on some vaccines. The additional information includes dosage, the interval to the next administration, and the reason for a vaccine.

Special vaccinations:  A complete schedule should contain explanations for particular vaccines such as Hepatitis A and others.

Immunization record

It is a simple document that includes the following details:

  • The date of the vaccination
  • The dosage,
  • Age of the person,
  • The facility and
  • The name of the doctor

The reason for immunization is also provided in some cases. The date for the next dose may be indicated if necessary.

Related: Medical Consent Forms

Free Immunization Record Templates

Immunization is essential for the health of your child until they are past their teenage. However, since the government has no policy that monitors if a child is vaccinated or not, each parent must bear the responsibility. The primary advantage of taking your child’s health into your own hands is that the health needs of children vary from child to child.

Creating a vaccination schedule can be hectic. Fortunately, there are free immunization schedules and immunization templates that you can use. You can download these free templates in either PDF or Excel format. You can select different schedules records and discuss with your doctor the one that is most suitable for your child’s health needs. Try these free templates today.

    Combination Vaccines

    Persons can receive combination vaccines instead of receiving separate injections, provided guidelines are followed.

    VaccinesAbbreviationsTrade Names
    DTaP-hepatitis B-inactivated poliovirus vaccineDTaP-HepB-IPVPediarix®
    DTaP inactivated-poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccineDTaP-IPV/HibPentacel®
    DTaP-inactivated poliovirus vaccineDTaP-IPVKinrix®
    Quadracel®
    DTaP-inactivated poliovirus-Haemophilus influenzae type b-hepatitis B vaccineDTaP-IPV-Hib-HepBVaxelis®
    Measles-mumps rubella-varicella vaccinesMMRVProQuad®

    Final Words

    Parents should ascertain that their children are appropriately vaccinated and according to the right schedule. Significant delays in administering vaccines put children at risk of contracting serious diseases that could sometimes be fatal. However, if a vaccine dose is missed, parents should consult their doctor and determine the catch-up vaccination options available. Catch-up vaccination is meant to “catch up” with the routine schedule. Familiarizing oneself with appropriate vaccinations recommendations is important because some vaccines are recommended only under certain specific circumstances.

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